TIMBER BEAST FROM LAZY MAGNOLIA // DRINK SLOWLY ON YOUR BACK PORCH

I was at a local gas station that I always go to just to buy beer. I only buy beer there because the gas is too expensive, but that’s beside the point.
As I was browsing, I saw an end cap with a stack of beers in four packs with a handmade sign that read “special arrival.”
With my interest piqued, I skipped over the pilsners and wheat beers and went straight for the IPAs. The label on the Timber Beast carrier is what immediately caught my eye; with the arrowhead-like frame and the lumberjack, I knew these were going to be my purchase.
Okay, so let me start by saying this: I do not know why, but Lazy Magnolia is so hit-or-miss with me. I really like Southern Pecan, because it takes the nuttiness of a brown ale to another level by packing in the taste of roasted pecans that really enhances the taste.
On the other hand, I really dislike the Jefferson Stout, because it says it’s supposed to be a sweet potato cream stout (which sounds awesome in theory) but it was just too bitter for my liking, and not to mention there aren’t really any noticeable sweet potato flavors.
And then I come across Timber Beast; it’s not at all what I was expecting and I believe it was an instance of a label that was way cooler than the beer it was on top of.
We’ll go over the basics before I get down to what I thought about it. The Timber Beast is the first beer in Lazy Magnolia’s Back Porch Series, which encourages enjoying these beers slowly and on your back porch, I guess, but I chose a couch because I make my own rules.
The beer pours a deep amber color with a finger-width of frothy head that settles very slowly. The aromas were really pine forward, which continues to play on the lumberjack motif, but there are some rye aromas there, too, that really make the scent very bold.
The flavors continue to drive in that pine flavor, but with some added grapefruit toward the front end that is followed quickly by a spicy rye note that then evolves into a bread-like undertone from the malt that really seems to help tie the beer together in the end. I wasn’t really a fan of the flavor, because, for an Imperial IPA, it wasn’t really hitting the right points for me. There may have been too much of those rye notes that I’m not usually a fan of. That goes especially for when I’ve had a few beers and then I switch a rye forward brew; it just seems to taste really heavy on the rye. The beer finishes up dry with more of the peppery rye flavor and some lingering pine and grapefruit flavors in the aftertaste that made it a little more enjoyable.
The mouthfeel was very smooth and not harsh, much like most would expect from an Imperial IPA. The carbonation level was just where I like it, with a classic creaminess from the rye that made this beer extra velvety. A medium body centered it and there is, what some people say, “a hidden alcohol content,” which I think is absolutely false, because I could taste it right off the bat.
Though other reviewers give it high marks, I wasn’t exactly impressed by this beer, and don’t let that deter you from trying it, because I encourage everyone to try everything once. I really love the Terrapin Rye Pale Ale, and I guess that’s what I was expecting here.
Overall, it was pretty good, but it definitely isn’t worth the twelve bucks I paid for it, especially since it only comes in a four pack.

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